TRAVEL: People & Places: TokyoNG_1400_145

CHIYODA WARD, CENTRAL TOKYO, JAPAN -APRIL 2017: People in rented boats enjoy a close view of the cherry blossom on Tokyo Imperial Palace's moat during Hanami. Hanami, or {quote}flower viewing{quote}, is the Japanese traditional custom of enjoying the transient beauty of flowers; flowers ({quote}hana{quote}) are in this case almost always referring to those of the cherry ({quote}sakura{quote}) or, less frequently, plum ({quote}ume{quote}) trees. From the end of March to early May, cherry trees bloom all over Japan. The blossom forecast (sakura-zensen) {quote}cherry blossom front{quote} is announced each year by the weather bureau, and is watched carefully by those planning hanami as the blossoms only last a week or two. In modern-day Japan, hanami mostly consists of having an outdoor party beneath the sakura during daytime or at night. Hanami at night is called yozakura {quote}night sakura{quote}. In many places, temporary paper lanterns are hung for the purpose of yozakura (photo Gilles Mingasson).

CHIYODA WARD, CENTRAL TOKYO, JAPAN -APRIL 2017: People in rented boats enjoy a close view of the cherry blossom on Tokyo Imperial Palace's moat during Hanami. Hanami, or "flower viewing", is the Japanese traditional custom of enjoying the transient beauty of flowers; flowers ("hana") are in this case almost always referring to those of the cherry ("sakura") or, less frequently, plum ("ume") trees. From the end of March to early May, cherry trees bloom all over Japan. The blossom forecast (sakura-zensen) "cherry blossom front" is announced each year by the weather bureau, and is watched carefully by those planning hanami as the blossoms only last a week or two. In modern-day Japan, hanami mostly consists of having an outdoor party beneath the sakura during daytime or at night. Hanami at night is called yozakura "night sakura". In many places, temporary paper lanterns are hung for the purpose of yozakura (photo Gilles Mingasson).